Orientation. Or Maybe I Should Say Picture Orientation

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4 May 2016
86
431
City
York
I noticed a number of images recently uploaded sideways. When asked the uploaders said 'I don't know why, it was the right way round when I uploaded it?'. One possible reason: some cameras have a motion sensor and use it to set an 'orientation' flag in the 'tiff header' (Yes, I know, you uploaded a jpeg, but jpegs are really a special case tiff). Windows 8 & 10 use the flag to orient the image when they display them (Macs may too, I've just never tested it): Win 7 doesn't. Some Unix and Linux varieties don't either. Server farm managers tend to use older technologies for reliability so some of the software updates to manage orientation have not been applied, hence, your nice portrait orientated picture gets served to the web in landscape. Hence the unexpected sidewaysness.

I first noticed this because I sync all my files between my Win 10 laptop and Win 7 desktop: it seriously pissed me off, but I dutifully reoriented my pics on Win 7 and sync them back.

This wasn't always convenient when updating my web pages on vacation so I researched my picture management tool, Irfanview, and found a setting 'Autorotate Picture according top Exif Settings' which I turned off, and Voila, my pictures in Irfanview are displayed in their native mode. I rotate them and like magic they stay that way despite Windows.

BTW, Web servers routinely strip Exif data (you know, that bit that contains your name and copyright, the picture title and camera settings (including GPF if you have it turned on)). This is not usually a problem, but if you have included your name and copyright - known as 'Rights Data' - it is stripped off too, essentially your proof that you OWN that image. It is technically a violation of the Berne Convention and in some countries, illegal. You should always update this info on your images, it is a way to establish that you own the image if you ever get into a dispute. Remember too, if you give your camera to someone else to take your picture they technically own the copyright - there is arguably an implicit contract that they are ceding the rights to you but a right prick could make life difficult for you.
 
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Admin

Admin
15 September 2014
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I noticed a number of images recently uploaded sideways. When asked the uploaders said 'I don't know why, it was the right way round when I uploaded it?'. One possible reason: some cameras have a motion sensor and use it to set an 'orientation' flag in the 'tiff header' (Yes, I know, you uploaded a jpeg, but jpegs are really a special case tiff). Windows 8 & 10 use the flag to orient the image when they display them (Macs may too, I've just never tested it): Win 7 doesn't. Some Unix and Linux varieties don't either. Server farm managers tend to use older technologies for reliability so some of the software updates to manage orientation have not been applied, hence, your nice portrait orientated picture gets served to the web in landscape. Hence the unexpected sidewaysness.
Yes this can be an issue as the camera and then said software will set it to what it 'thinks' is the correct orientation.
At all; if you have any that are incorrectly orientated just give me a nudge and I will help.
With regards to the rest of the post, you are correct and it's very informative for anyone who wishes to know such technical information.
Remember, EXIF is important but also can be used for other things.
In my personal and professional opinion, you should disable GPS long/lat tracking and location services, which all leave traceable data and even Geo-locale.
Simply put - if you don't want to be found, don't use it.
NB I don't mean here btw, I mean on places online et al.

Good post @Haitink (y)
 
4 May 2016
86
431
City
York
In my personal and professional opinion, you should disable GPS long/lat tracking and location services, which all leave traceable data and even Geo-locale.
Simply put - if you don't want to be found, don't use it.
Yes, if you are travelling abroad, anywhere politically sensitive, then turn gps off, or remove it before uploading it anywhere. Journalists have had some hairy experiences after pictures with sensitive content have been traced back to them: and not because of picture content but for what they might have seen because they were near something really sensitive.
 
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Admin

Admin
15 September 2014
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Yes, if you are travelling abroad, anywhere politically sensitive, then turn gps off, or remove it before uploading it anywhere. Journalists have had some hairy experiences after pictures with sensitive content have been traced back to them: and not because of picture content but for what they might have seen because they were near something really sensitive.
Absolutely.! Look at what Snowden has invented to protect journalists from such tracking.
it's frightening how this data can be used if in the wrong hands.

Also, I have just rummaged through the gallery and amended the orientation of some which were out.
 
M

MickeyBlueBalls

Dayem Haitink. I don't know what any of that means but does it come with stockings and suspenders and a cute smile? :)
 
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